The team at Bond Sanchez-Gordon recognizes dealing with injuries, hospitals and insurance companies after a motorcycle accident can be confusing and frustrating. After many discussions with visitors just like you, we’ve compiled some of their most frequently asked questions with short, helpful answers you can use.

It’s probably not startling to hear motorcycle accidents are more dangerous than car accidents.  Logically, the rate is higher, given the lack of protection to the driver compared to an auto.

However, one of the things making an already dangerous situation more so is alcohol; it is a significant factor in motorcycle crashes – particularly fatal ones.

Whether you need advice about injuries, doctors, hospitals, insurance companies — or even legal questions — our knowledgeable and compassionate team is ready to help you get the answers you need.

If you have motorcycle accident questions, Bond Sanchez-Gordon has answers! Review this page or just click on any of the items below to go right to a specific question. If you cannot find the answers you need here, please contact us here.

First I’d like to thank everyone at this office for representing me. I was in a multi-vehicle accident, I was injured and it was a frightening experience for me. My attorney was there for me every step of the way. Even as I recovering, this office truly helped with my healing process. The professionalism and genuine care I received made me compelled to share that I highly recommend this personal injury law firm. Everything was settled and I’m grateful I chose Bond Sanchez-Gordon.

Teresa Mendoza

The first thing you should do is to make sure you see a doctor right away. Getting in an accident of any kind will give you an adrenaline rush and cover up any pain you might have. An examination will document any injuries and determine recovery needs.

You should also call your insurance company and let them know what happened. Keep the information limited to what you can confirm as fact, no guessing. If you are not sure if you have an injury or the extent, don’t say anything. As an example, telling them you are ‘fine’ can negate any future coverage for injuries.

Finally, don’t delay in filing a claim. States have different time limits on how long you have to submit and missing the deadline will leave you no options for reimbursement or legal action.

Have you ever seen an athlete perform a miraculous set of moves and find out later they did it while injured with a broken bone? How can they do this? One word – adrenaline. There’s no doubt you feel good. If you were in a motorcycle accident, you will feel much worse in the days following the event. Not going through an exam could affect your health long-term and reduce any compensation you deserve.

If you can move around safely and without pain, take pictures. These can help a great deal later to support or dismiss details shared from witnesses.

Make sure to take shots of each car from every angle; high, low, all around the vehicle, and the motorcycle. Take detailed close-ups of the damage. Get long shots of the accident.

A note of caution — treat your photos as valuable property, because they are. Don’t give anyone access unless they are working on your case, such as your hired attorney.

If you can move around safely and without pain, take pictures. These can help a great deal later to support or dismiss details shared from witnesses.

Make sure to take shots of each car from every angle; high, low, all around the vehicle, and the motorcycle. Take detailed close-ups of the damage. Get long shots of the accident.

A note of caution — treat your photos as valuable property, because they are. Don’t give anyone access unless they are working on your case, such as your hired attorney.

Generally, if you are in an accident, your motorcycle sustained some severe damage, and you’ll likely be filing a claim. However, it’s a good rule of thumb to check what would happen to rates if you did file.

If the cost of the repair is less than how much the claim would raise your rates afterward, it’s best not to file. As an example, if it cost $150 to repair your bike but the insurance company will raise your rates by $500 per year, don’t file a claim.

If you do not have motorcycle insurance at the time of the accident, hire a personal injury attorney.

The short answer is, it depends on what kind of fault your state recognizes. If it is an at-fault state, and the police report shows the other driver is responsible for the accident, you would file a claim with their company for any injury and medical compensation. This is a third-party claim.

If their coverage is too low, you can file with your insurance company under the uninsured coverage policy section. If you don’t have this kind of coverage or don’t wish to submit with your insurance company, you may need to sue.

If you are in a no-fault state, you can file a claim with their insurer if they are at fault for property damages but getting medical compensation might be more complicated. Your policy will likely be the one covering personal injury expenses and those of anyone who was injured when riding with you.

Regardless of when there is a settlement from the responsible driver’s insurance company, you are still required to pay your medical bills. There are several ways to do this, starting with your own insurance company, if you carry medical payments coverage on your policy.

If not, you can also submit billing to:

  • Your health insurance with your employer
  • Your own personal health insurer
  • Your Medicare or Medicaid plan

Keep in mind, any payments from your insurance company during this period will have to be paid back once you receive settlement money.

Yes. Whether or not the driver at fault saw your motorcycle, they are responsible.

It depends on what state you were in when the accident happened, and what helmet and fault laws are in place.

There are three types of state helmet laws; universal, partial or no helmet law. 28 of the states are in effect for riders of a certain age – usually those under 18. Currently, only three states have no helmet laws.

Fault and no-fault laws will also play a part in the claim. If your state is no-fault, your insurance will be the one to handle the request for and you will NOT be able to recover damages from the other driver’s insurance. If you’re in an at-fault state, you can recover costs from the other driver’s insurance.

Unfortunately, in these cases, it is considered a single driver accident. Unless you are lucky enough to have an eye witness, the claim will be filed with your insurance company, and you will be determined to be the at-fault driver.

That’s a question best addressed by a lawyer. There is no definitive ‘yes’ or ‘no’ answer. The circumstances of each accident are different, as is the timeline to collect evidence, receipts, talk to witnesses, and managing other aspects of the claim.

It depends on how complicated your case is, the experience of your attorney, how much negotiation takes place, and any number of other issues.

For more answers to your personal injury questions from the experts at Bond Sanchez-Gordon, please contact us here or call us directly at 800.471.0314.